LiquidSonics Reverberate 2 Review

Conclusion There are two clearly distinguishable schools in the software reverb world: Almost every software maker has an algorithmic reverb, but not everyone has a convolution reverb. Which explains the success of products bundled with tons of IRs and the loss of interest of certain software makers, considering the high cost of producing such libraries. As such, it’s no wonder that new algorithm-based reverbs pop up like mushrooms every year while their convolution counterparts are clearly scarcer.
liquidsonics reverberate

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Conclusion There are two clearly distinguishable schools in the software reverb world: Almost every software maker has an algorithmic reverb, but not everyone has a convolution reverb.

Which explains the success of products bundled with tons of IRs and the loss of interest of certain software makers, considering the high cost of producing such libraries. As such, it’s no wonder that new algorithm-based reverbs pop up like mushrooms every year while their convolution counterparts are clearly scarcer.

Let’s see what this Reverberate 2 has in store for us… Technical aspects First, let’s take a look at the technical specs: Downloading the installation program is a relatively quick ordeal, since it’s only Mb. Afterwards the installation and authorization are a mere formality with a keyfile sent per e-mail after the purchase. Once that’s done Reverberate 2 and the basic IR library eat up about Mb of your hard drive. Needless to say that even with a good broadband connection it will take you a while to download them.

This will certainly make some people impatient, especially considering that these libraries are one of the main highlights of the upgrade Once downloaded, a small program allows you to easily choose a location for the huge libraries. At first there was no such program and I must admit that manual installation was a real feat, to say the least. Fortunately, LiquidSonics was quick to incorporate user feedback.

To close this not-so-funky chapter of the review, one last remark regarding CPU resources. On my machine a late Mac Pro with a six-core 3.

It’s relatively reasonable, especially if you consider that Reverberate is used in zero-latency mode. Fortunately, you can add some latency to provide a bit of relief for the processor. The toll on your system’s RAM will be noticeable. Previously on reverberate… Reverberate is a convolution reverb plug-in. It allows you to use your own IRs or those included in the bundle, which can be “simple,” “True Stereo,” or even more, as we’ll see later on.

Often, the main critique to this type of reverb is the “static” aspect of the result. The first Reverberate was not penny-pinching in this respect. But this new version offers an unheard of amount of possibilities to breathe life into even the most static impulse responses.

First of all, it allows you to load two IRs and adjust the resulting mix, as well as their place in the stereo field. You then have several options to modify each IR at will: Every IR has its own EQ, plus the one in the output section, all of which can be modulated. These three EQs are powerful and can be used to simulate “damping” or to do something completely different, like in the following example:

Conjugating the ‘verb

LiquidSonics Reverberate v1. And thoroughly removing an application is also good for decreasing the chances of getting system problems. So how to remove the application on a Mac computer? There are two methods here available for you to choose, one will take you much time and effort to complete it manually, and another one will be much easier and faster to conduct the removal for people. Two available ways to uninstall LiquidSonics Reverberate v1.

VIDEO: Uninstall Mac Programs

Reverberate 2 is coming register for the private beta launching in mid-October by emailing beta@dkey.finnflare.ru with your DAW details to get a sneak early. LiquidSonics’ Reverberate LE is a highly efficient convolution reverb audio processor free VST plugin for Windows based systems. Audiofanzine puts LiquidSonics’ Reverberate 2 software reverb to the test.

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