Installing Windows 7 on UEFI based computer

Extensions[ edit ] Extensions to EFI can be loaded from virtually any non-volatile storage device attached to the computer. TianoCore can be used as a payload for coreboot. In January , Apple Inc.
windows 7 loader uefi

Windows Loader 2.2.2 – By Daz

On Debian installation media, each of these files is again a copy of grub-efi with sufficient built-in code and configuration to find the rest of the system from there. First comes the partman-efi module, and this will be loaded automatically if d-i recognises it has been booted in UEFI mode. It knows how to set up an ESP with appropriate partition type and filesystem if necessary, and will ensure it’s correctly mounted on the installed system later. If the system already has an ESP, partman-efi will attempt to use that rather than create a new one.

This is for interoperability with existing operating systems in dual-boot systems. Once the normal installation process has been completed, the second major component with UEFI support comes into play: It will install the grub-efi bootloader to the right location in the ESP and will use efibootmgr to register that bootloader with the firmware. On correctly-working systems, this should work without needing any user interaction. See below for more details about those. Support for armhf was added in Buster This is the new preferred way of using UEFI configuration variables, and Debian switched to it by default from Stretch onwards.

The exact details of these interfaces are hidden from view somewhat by efibootmgr and efivar , userland software packages written to work with them. Initially, all of the code was written directly in efibootmgr but more recently the lower-level code has been split out into the library efivar to make it easier to share this code with other utilities like fwupd.

Read the man pages for these for full details, but here are a couple of examples from a system with many devices: This worked for many users, but various users reported issues.

Most of these were not directly bugs in Debian’s UEFI support, but nonetheless we have added workarounds to help these people. It gives them the option to switch the installer to non-UEFI mode from this point forwards so they don’t break potential dual-boot setup.

Despite the specification for boot entries and boot order being quite clear about how things should work, there are lots of systems in the wild which get it wrong. Some systems simply ignore valid requests to add new boot entries. Others will accept those requests, but will refuse to use them unless they describe themselves as “Windows” or similar. There are lots of other similar bugs out there, suggesting that many system vendors have done very little testing beyond “does it work with Windows?

But, because of the buggy firmware implementations out there, operating system distributors cannot necessarily expect that this will work correctly for all systems. Microsoft have worked around this and arguably also made the problem worse – the Windows installer also installs to the removable media path in the ESP e. All firmware implentations have to use this path to be able to run an OS installer. This means that Windows will always work on all these broken implementations, but it also means that system vendors can get away with shipping broken implementations.

It removes the idea of having a fallback boot path and sensible control of boot order. All OS installers installing things to this removable media path will conflict with any other such installers, which is bad and wrong. That’s why in Debian we don’t do this by default. However, to help support those unfortunate people who own buggy systems like this, there is an option to force grub-efi installation to the removable media path too.

There is a d-i Rescue Mode option to force this – if you’ve just installed Debian on your UEFI system but it won’t boot Debian afterwards, this may fix the problem for you. It can also be selected during the normal installation run using Expert mode, or preseed users can add the following option in their configuration for amd64, tweak the package name to suit on other architectures: Support for mixed-mode systems: Using the bit UEFI x86 support, an i installation should be possible on these machines but it won’t make the most of the bit hardware.

Debian Jessie 8. The multi-arch installation media available in netinst and DVD form include the UEFI boot loaders necessary for both i and amd64 boot.

By selecting “bit install” from the initial boot menu, debian-installer will install a bit amd64 version of Debian. The system will automatically detect that the underlying UEFI firmware is bit and will install the appropriate version of grub-efi to work with it.

Missing features Although Debian releases since Wheezy 7. The accompanying live images did not have support for UEFI boot. See SecureBoot for more details on how this works. It will be supported for all the installation media and live media that we create for these platforms. For systems with hardware RAID, that will provide some backup in case of disk failure. There might be a way to do something useful with fallback options, but this will need some investigation If that exists, the system is running in UEFI mode.

Diagnosing problems with boot order efibootmgr is your friend. Run it without parameters to simply list the boot options and boot order on your system, or add -v for more detail of where each boot entry points.

After that, check to see if you have Secure Boot enabled – we didn’t support Secure Boot until version If that still doesn’t help, you may have a buggy firmware implementation. Try installing to the removable media path – see above for instructions. Particularly useful ones include:

Letöltés: [v.2.2.2]

On Debian installation media, each of these files is again a copy of grub-efi with sufficient built-in code and configuration to find the rest of the system from there. First comes the partman-efi module, and this will be loaded automatically if d-i recognises it has been booted in UEFI mode. It knows how to set up an ESP with appropriate partition type and filesystem if necessary, and will ensure it’s correctly mounted on the installed system later. If the system already has an ESP, partman-efi will attempt to use that rather than create a new one. This is for interoperability with existing operating systems in dual-boot systems. Once the normal installation process has been completed, the second major component with UEFI support comes into play: It will install the grub-efi bootloader to the right location in the ESP and will use efibootmgr to register that bootloader with the firmware.

VIDEO: Booting Windows 7 / 10 from GPT Disk on BIOS (non-UEFI) systems

You can click the ubuntu entry in EasyUEFI’s list and move it to the top. . Just use the Windows boot loader, I think it can be configured to boot. The Unified Extensible Firmware Interface (UEFI) is a specification that defines a software . UEFI requires the firmware and operating system loader (or kernel) to be size-matched; .. The bit versions of Windows 7 are compatible with EFI. Note that converting from MBR to GPT is only part of the job; the more important task is installing an EFI-mode boot loader for Windows.

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